2SLGBTQ

The purpose of this research is to examine the nature and context of intimate partner violence (IPV) within the 2SLGBTQ community across the prairie provinces. In doing so, this research aims to garner a comprehensive understanding of the service responses toward the issue and the possible barriers that might exist in relation to accessing these services. IPV refers to any form of physical, sexual, psychological, emotional, financial, and/or spiritual abuse perpetrated by one partner over the other in an effort to exert power and control (World Health Organization, 2012). In 2017, there were approximately 96,000 police-reported incidents of IPV in Canada, accounting for nearly one-third of all incidents reported to police during that year (Burczycka, Conroy, & Savage, 2018). Within the 2SLGBTQ community, there were 22,323 incidents of police-reported same-sex IPV in Canada between 2009 and 2017 (Ibrahim, 2019). This issue has particular significance within the prairie provinces where rates of IPV are amongst the highest in the country (Burczycka & Conroy, 2018).
To date, most IPV research has focused on the experiences of women in heterosexual relationships. Consequently, there exists a dearth of research examining experiences of IPV within the 2SLGBTQ community (Donovan & Hester, 2014), particularly within rural, remote, and northern locations. Existing research does not provide a clear picture of the context, severity, and consequences of IPV against 2SLGBTQ persons making it difficult to develop appropriate services to meet the needs of this population. The proposed study will address this gap through a mixed method (qualitative and quantitative) examination of 2SLGBTQ experiences, including the nature, severity, context, and consequences of IPV incidents, their experiences of help- seeking, and gaps and barriers experienced by 2SLGBTQ persons who do seek help. The findings will be used to develop recommendations to improve services for 2SLGBTQ victims/survivors of IPV as well as strategies for intervention and prevention. This two-year project will be taking place between the spring of 2020 and 2022.

Principle Investigator:

Dr. Kendra Nixon

Academic Partners:

Dr. Nicole Letourneau (University of Calgary);
Dr. Karen Wood (University of Saskatchewan);

Dr. Janice Ristock and Dr. Tracey Peter (University of Manitoba)

Research Assistant:

Renée Hoffart, Shaylyn White

Community Partners:

Rainbow Resource Centre, OUTSaskatoon, Sagesse

Funders:

PrairieAction Foundation | Community Action, Research & Education (CARE) Grant Program

Length of Project:

2 years

Rural

The purpose of this study is to explore rural women's experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) and help-seeking across the Prairie Provinces. IPV is behaviour that causes harm to partners in an intimate relationship and includes physical and sexual violence, emotional (psychological) abuse, and controlling behaviours (World Health Organization, 2013). IPV is recognized as a serious social and public health issue with devastating consequences for individuals and families (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2016). Although there is a growing body of research on female survivors of IPV, there is a paucity of research on the experiences of rural women. Existing studies do not provide a clear picture of the unique circumstances of rural women who experience IPV or of the obstacles they face when seeking safety for themselves and their children. The proposed study will address this knowledge gap through a qualitative examination of rural women that will document the ways in which rural culture and context impacts their experience of IPV, how these experiences interact with co-occurring challenges experienced by women, and the barriers and challenges that occur within this context as women seek help. The findings of this research will be used to develop recommendations to improve services for rural women as well as strategies for intervention and prevention and to develop recommendations for future research in this area. This two-year project will be taking place between the spring of 2020 and 2022.

Principle Investigator:

Dr. Kendra Nixon

Academic Partners:

Dr. Cheryl Fraehlich (University of Manitoba);
Dr. Karen Wood and Dr. Carolyn Brooks (University of Saskatchewan);
Dr. Nicole Letourneau (University of Calgary);
Dr. Dawn McBride (University of Lethbridge)

Research Assistant:

Kayla Arisman

Community Partners:

Women’s Resource Centre in Brandon
Ending Violence Across Manitoba (EVA MB)

Provincial Association of Transition Houses & Services of Saskatchewan (PATHS)

Odyssey House Women’s Shelter

Dr. Margaret Savage Crisis Centre

Safe Heaven Women’s Shelter Society

Family and Community Support Services and Sagesse

Funders:

PrairieAction Foundation | Community Action, Research & Education (CARE) Grant Program

Length of Project:

2 years

Three Short Films

The goal is to create three short training videos involving Indigenous men from rural, remote, and/or northern communities, who may or may not have been affected by interpersonal violence, themselves. They will reflect on colonialist legacies around gender and intergenerational trauma, integrating Indigenous ways of choosing healing action. This project emerges from a collaborative knowledge mobilization request made to RESOLVE Saskatchewan Director, Dr. Karen Wood, addressing interpersonal and gendered violence in local First Nations communities. Executive Director of Saskatchewan’s Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services (PATHS), passed on a request received from a First Nation for video resources to be used in men’s violence prevention groups. The videos will offer a vital resource for First Nations and Métis communities, wherever internet access is limited. Participants will guide development and retain ownership of the videos, with the potential to upscale to a larger program, developing more videos and related research on reducing violence in other communities. The proposed topics: Coercive Control and Insidious Trauma; Colonization, Gender Roles, and Healing Intergenerational Trauma; and Sustaining Healthy Relationships, will be revised and elaborated in consultation with community.

Principle Investigator:

Dr. Karen Wood
Dr. Marie Lovrod

Research Assistant:

Morgana Machea

Community Partners:

Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation (PBCN)

Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services (PATHS)

Funders:

SHRF Truth and Action: Research Connections grant

ATTACH Program

The purpose is to undertake an effectiveness-implementation hybrid (EIH) design study of ATTACH, a parenting program, to be implemented at community agencies across the Prairie Provinces, for families of preschoolers affected by toxic stress.

Principle Investigator:

Letourneau, N., Ross, K., Birnie, K., Grahan, I., Kobor, M., Merrill, S., Nixon, K., Pitrowski, C., Wood, K.

Community Partners:

Aubrey, M., Baumann, J., Citro, E., Cole, S., Jalton, J., Donnelly, C., Hart, M., Isaac, D., Johnson-Green, J., Nandee, C., Paraker, N., Piekarski, J., Pociuk, S., Taylor, S.

Funders:

CIHR

Length of Project:

3 years